| LDO Home | General | Kidney | Liver | Marrow | Experiences | Buddies | Hall of Fame | Calendar | Contact Us |

Author Topic: The Challenge of Informed Consent for Increased Risk Living Donation and Transpl  (Read 1511 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Clark

  • Administrator
  • Top 10 Poster!
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,785
  • Please give the gift of life!
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2011.03814.x/abstract

The Challenge of Informed Consent for Increased Risk Living Donation and Transplantation
E. J. Gordon1,*, N. Beauvais2, N. Theodoropoulos3,4, J. Hanneman2, G. McNatt2, D. Penrod2, S. Jensen5, J. Franklin3, L. Sherman3, M. G. Ison3,4
DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2011.03814.x
American Journal of Transplantation
Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue)

Abstract

The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) mandates that organ recipients provide “specific informed consent” before accepting organs that the OPTN defines as “increased risk”. However, the OPTN does not provide specific guidelines for what information should be disclosed to potential recipients. Such vagueness opens the door to inadequate informed consent. This paper examines the ethical dimensions of informed consent when the prospective living donor has self-reported behaviors associated with increased risk for infection transmission. Donor privacy is a primary ethical concern that conflicts with recipients’ informed consent for use of increased risk organs. We propose that both the increased risk status and the specific behavior be disclosed to the recipient. Because the actual risk posed is linked to the type of risk behavior, disclosure is therefore needed to make an informed decision. The donor's risk behavior is material to recipients’ decision making because it may impact the donor–recipient relationship. This relationship is the foundation of the donation and acceptance transaction, and thus comprises a critical feature of the recipient's informed consent. Optimizing a recipient's informed consent is essential to protecting patient safety and autonomy.
Unrelated directed kidney donor in 2003, 500+ time blood & platelet donor and counting!
Rep to the OPTN/UNOS Boards of Directors & Executive, Kidney Transplantation, & Ad Hoc Public Solicitation of Organ Donors Committees 2005-2011

 

 Subscribe in a reader



Copyright © International Association of Living Organ Donors, Inc. All Rights Reserved
traditional