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Author Topic: How Much Water Should You Drink?  (Read 2389 times)

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Offline Michael

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How Much Water Should You Drink?
« on: September 26, 2022, 12:27:49 PM »
How much water should someone drink? It's a common question, especially among recent kidney donors. I ran across this 19-minute podcast that shares the latest information on this topic, and dispels common myths: https://www.npr.org/2022/09/20/1124133408/water-water-everywhere-but-how-much-do-you-really-need
Michael
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Offline Michael

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Re: How Much Water Should You Drink?
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2022, 01:35:00 PM »
Report Sets Dietary Intake Levels for Water, Salt, and Potassium To Maintain Health and Reduce Chronic Disease Risk
There was also a 2004 study that explored this question, as well as the right levels of sodium and potassium, which are also important considerations for kidney health. A summary of that study can be found here (and it has a link to the full study): https://www.nationalacademies.org/news/2004/02/report-sets-dietary-intake-levels-for-water-salt-and-potassium-to-maintain-health-and-reduce-chronic-disease-risk

As for water, the guidelines are:
  • Let thirst be your guide.
  • Women: the average is 2.7 liters (91 ounces) of "total water" per day to be adequately hydrated.
  • Men: the average is 3.7 liters (125 ounces) of "total water" per day to be adequately hydrated.
  • People who are very physically active or live in hot climates may need to increase the amount of "total water" they consume.
  • "Total water" includes liquids from beverages (water, juice, milk, etc.) -- including caffeinated drinks like coffee and tea -- and from the moisture in food.

« Last Edit: July 20, 2023, 01:30:04 PM by Michael »
Michael
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Offline Michael

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Re: How Much Water Should You Drink?
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2023, 01:53:26 PM »
Meaning Behind Color of Your Urine
https://adultpediatricuro.com/meaning-behind-color-of-your-urine/

Occasionally I'll see advice in social media posts to use the color of your urine as a way to determine if you are properly hydrated. Is it legitimate? Several resources online suggest it can be an indicator of overhydration or dehydration. Here is one example: https://adultpediatricuro.com/meaning-behind-color-of-your-urine/

> Clear: you might be drinking too much water.
> Light yellow: your kidneys are functioning properly and you have an appropriate diet.
> Dark yellow to orange: you're dehydrated.

However, the National Kidney Foundation cautions that "The color of your pee can offer clues into your health, but kidney disease typically doesn't show any visible symptoms, so the only way to know if you have it is to get tested." Thus, while urine color can suggest how you're doing with hydration, it is not a measure of whether or not you have kidney disease.
https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/what-color-your-urine-means
Michael
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Offline Michael

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Re: How Much Water Should You Drink?
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2023, 02:11:02 PM »
What is Too Much Water Intake?
https://www.webmd.com/diet/what-is-too-much-water-intake

WebMD: "When you drink too much water, you may experience water poisoning, intoxication, or a disruption of brain function."

Symptoms:
  • Your pee is clear.
  • Frequent urination.
  • Drinking water even when you're not thirsty.
  • Nausea or vomiting.
  • Throbbing headaches all through the day.
  • Discoloration of the hands, feet, and lips.
  • Weak muscles that cramp easily.
  • Tiredness or fatigue
Michael
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